Annotated Code of Maryland

Although there are many references to the "Annotated Code of Maryland" (or "Michie's Annotated Code"), an online copy cannot be found. It was online several years ago. The 2015 Legislative Drafting Manual for 2016 states that "the present edition of the Annotated Code is the 1957 Edition" although also that "now there are replacement volumes for all the original 1957 volumes" and describes how it is supplemented each year, as if it is only a paper document. (In fact, it is described as being a "series of volumes bound in black or red" with the "red" gradually replaceing the "black". How archiac!) It only appears to be available for purchase from the LexisNexis Store as "51 high quality (bound) volumes" for $1,596, offering "convenient research". No paper copy can be as "convenient" for searching for material in an electronic copy.

The 2016 "Legislative Drafting Manual" states that "The statutory law of the State of Maryland generally is found in Michie’s Annotated Code of Maryland". While it also refers to the "West's Annoted Code of Maryland", it notes that the Department of Legislative Serices uses the Michies version, implying that they are not the same. What a mess!

(This "Drafting Manual" goes on to describe the "old-fashinoned" way of drafting bills using "cut-and-paste" after "photocopying" the present contents. Scary!)

The "Unannotated" version is online free of charge while the "Annotated" version is only available on the "in-house computer database". Why!

If anyone can provide an understandable explanation of the significance of the "annotated" vs. the "unannotated" version to the general public, especially if referenced in a legal manner, please send it to me. For example, 11.01.16.02 of COMAR states: "Contested case means a proceeding so defined under the State Government Article §10-202(d), Annotated Code of Maryland." Is there some reason why this does not simply refer to the "Code of Maryland", and let the user refer to either the "annotated" or "unannotated" copy, whichever they have access to?